BRING THE WORLD HOME
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In this blog post, we delve into the heart of Argentine identity, exploring the best souvenirs that encapsulate the spirit of Buenos Aires. This blog post invites you to explore the beating heart of Argentine identity through the lens of its most distinctive treasures. 

Picture yourself navigating the colorful markets, where the rhythmic melodies of tango fill the air, and artisans craft mate gourds with intricate precision—a nod to the communal spirit that defines Argentine gatherings. Immerse yourself in the world of artisans, where each hand-stitched alpargata or meticulously tooled leather piece echoes the stories of gauchos, the iconic horsemen of the pampas. 

Beyond mere trinkets, these souvenirs are gateways to the soul of Buenos Aires, inviting you to unravel the layers of its cultural narrative. ¡Bienvenidos a la Ciudad de Tango!

1. Yerba Mate

When in Buenos Aires or other parts of Argentina, experiencing yerba mate is not just about the beverage itself but also about embracing the social and cultural aspects associated with its consumption. Consider trying mate in a local setting to fully appreciate the tradition.

2. Yerba Mate Sets

Argentine mate culture is significant, and you’ll find a variety of mate cups made from materials like wood, metal, and ceramic. Some may even feature intricate designs or local artwork.

Alongside the gourd and bombilla, you can find mate accessories such as thermoses for hot water, special carrying bags, and even electric mate heaters for convenient preparation.

yerba mate

3. Leather Goods

Buenos Aires is renowned for its quality leather products. Look for leather jackets, bags, wallets, and belts in the city’s many markets and shops. San Telmo is a great area for leather shopping.

4. Dulce de Leche

A sweet, caramel-like spread made from condensed milk, dulce de leche is a staple in Argentine cuisine. You can buy jars of this delicious treat as souvenirs, often in decorative packaging.

cookies and chocolates

5. Alfajores

These are traditional Argentine sweets consisting of two cookies sandwiched together with dulce de leche and coated in chocolate or powdered sugar. They come in various flavors and make for tasty, portable souvenirs.

macaroons and glass filled with milk

6. Buenos Aires Cityscape Prints

Capture the beauty of Buenos Aires with cityscape prints or posters depicting iconic landmarks like the Obelisco, Plaza de Mayo, or the colorful streets of La Boca.

7. Postcards

A postcard is a great souvenir gift because it keeps the essence of a destination in a simple yet meaningful way. It captures a specific moment, scene, or landmark, allowing the recipient to visually connect with the place. Postcards are easy to transport, affordable, and offer a personal touch as they’re often handwritten with heartfelt messages. 

8. Football Memorabilia

In Argentina, football isn’t merely a sport; it’s a cultural cornerstone deeply embedded in the nation’s identity. The passion for “fútbol” transcends diverse backgrounds, uniting people in a collective fervor. The iconic blue and white stripes of the national football team jersey symbolize more than just athletic prowess; they represent a profound sense of national pride. On match days, streets come alive with a sea of jerseys as fans converge in cafes, homes, and stadiums to passionately support their beloved teams.

Icons like Diego Maradona and Lionel Messi transcend their roles as athletes; they are elevated to the status of national heroes. The allegiance to football clubs like Boca Juniors and River Plate runs deep, igniting a fierce loyalty that defines the very fabric of fan culture.

Beyond the field, football culture in Argentina encompasses cherished traditions like mate-sharing during matches. Friends and family gather, savoring the game alongside the national drink. This cultural influence extends beyond the pitch, weaving itself into art, music, and literature, enriching the diverse tapestry of Argentine culture. In essence, football in Argentina is more than a pastime; it’s a cultural phenomenon that shapes the nation’s narrative and fosters a profound sense of unity through a shared love for the beautiful game.

9. Polo Gear

Argentina is a polo powerhouse, and you can find polo-related items like jerseys, mallets, and accessories. San Antonio de Areco, a town near Buenos Aires, is known for its polo culture.

10. Handwoven Textiles

Indigenous artisan markets often feature handwoven textiles with vibrant colors and intricate patterns. These can include ponchos, blankets, and rugs made by local artisans.

11. Quirky “Fileteado” Art

Fileteado is a traditional Argentine art form characterized by colorful, ornamental designs. Look for items adorned with this distinctive style, such as posters, magnets, or even painted mate cups.

12. Tango Related Items

Tango originated in the diverse neighborhoods of Buenos Aires in the late 19th century, evolving from a mix of cultural influences brought by immigrants. Born in working-class communities, Tango combined elements of African and European dance styles, incorporating rhythms from Cuban habanera and African candombe. Initially considered controversial, Tango gained acceptance and popularity, spreading internationally during the early 20th century. It was shaped by the vibrant urban culture of Buenos Aires, becoming a symbolic dance that transcended its humble beginnings.

woman in black and white striped long sleeve shirt and brown skirt sitting on floor

13. Mugs

A mug is a great souvenir gift because it combines functionality and sentimentality. It’s a practical item that can be used daily, reminding the recipient of their travels while enjoying their favorite beverages. The design of the mug often showcases the destination’s iconic landmarks, culture, or artwork, creating a visual connection to the place. 

14. Vintage Items from San Telmo Market

San Telmo’s Sunday market is a treasure trove of vintage finds. Consider unique antiques, old postcards, or retro items as distinctive souvenirs.

15. Argentine Flag Merchandise

Items featuring the Argentine flag, such as clothing, bags, and accessories, are popular and patriotic souvenirs.

a flag flying in the wind with a clock tower in the background

16. Artwork from Local Galleries

Buenos Aires has a thriving art scene, and you can find unique pieces from local artists in galleries throughout the city. Consider paintings, sculptures, or prints as a lasting reminder of your visit.

9. Polo Gear

Argentina is a polo powerhouse, and you can find polo-related items like jerseys, mallets, and accessories. San Antonio de Areco, a town near Buenos Aires, is known for its polo culture.

10. Handwoven Textiles

Indigenous artisan markets often feature handwoven textiles with vibrant colors and intricate patterns. These can include ponchos, blankets, and rugs made by local artisans.

11. Quirky “Fileteado” Art

Fileteado is a traditional Argentine art form characterized by colorful, ornamental designs. Look for items adorned with this distinctive style, such as posters, magnets, or even painted mate cups.

17. Parrilla Accessories 

Given Argentina’s love for grilling (asado), consider bringing back parrilla accessories like barbecue utensils, grill pans, or even a traditional Argentine parrilla (grill) if you have the means.

18. Traditional Clothing

Look for traditional clothing items like ponchos, berets (boinas), or alpargatas (espadrilles). These pieces often reflect the country’s cultural heritage.

19. Gaucho Gear

Gaucho culture in Argentina, epitomized by skilled horsemen and cattle herders of the pampas, is marked by nomadic life and iconic attire. Their influence is seen in Argentina’s barbecue tradition, folk music, spirited dances like the “zamba,” and a strong connection with horses. Mate-sharing and vibrant gaucho festivals, or “fiestas gauchas,” celebrate this rich cultural heritage, remaining integral even as the traditional gaucho lifestyle adapts to modern times.


Argentina’s cowboy culture is reflected in gaucho gear. Look for items like leather hats (bombachas), belts, and knives (facones) that pay homage to the country’s rural heritage.

20. Fridge Magnets

Nowadays, a lot of people engage in collecting refrigerator magnets. Whether you’re a fellow collector or looking to buy one as a gift, there’s a wide variety of magnets featuring exquisite landscapes.

21. Artisan Crafts

Explore local markets like Feria de Mataderos for handmade crafts. Artisanal items such as pottery, textiles, and folk art can make unique and authentic souvenirs.

22. Wine

Argentina is known for its excellent wine, particularly Malbec. Consider bringing back a bottle or two from a local vineyard or wine shop.

23. Antique Books

If you’re a book lover, explore antique bookstores for rare or vintage editions of Argentine literature or books about the country’s history and culture.

24. Wooden Handicrafts

Hand-carved wooden items, such as figurines or utensils, showcase the craftsmanship of local artisans. These unique pieces can be found in artisan markets and craft shops.

25. Hand-Painted Tiles

Decorative tiles featuring intricate hand-painted designs are a popular souvenir. These tiles often depict scenes from Argentine life or showcase the vibrant colors of the country.

26. Coffee

Bring home the rich flavors of Argentine coffee with a bag of Café de Buenos Aires. This high-quality coffee is often available in specialty stores or coffee shops.

27. Graphic Novels and Comics

Argentina has a strong tradition of graphic novels and comics. Visit bookstores to find works by renowned Argentine comic artists, adding a cultural touch to your collection.

If you don’t know it yet, we strongly recommend Mafalda. It is an Argentine comic strip character created by cartoonist Joaquín Salvador Lavado, better known as Quino. Mafalda first appeared in 1964 and became widely popular for her humorous and insightful commentary on society and politics. The comic strip follows the life of a six-year-old girl named Mafalda and her interactions with her family and friends. Mafalda’s character is deeply rooted in Argentine culture, and the comic strip remains an iconic part of Argentina’s literary and cultural history.

a couple of statues of people sitting on a bench
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